Selena Parnon

Scroll down for the German Translation

SELENA PARNON

Charlie Stein: Self Portraiture as Information-Based Cultural Critique

 

Since the turn of the millennium, developed countries have seen the proliferation of Facebook (2005), Instagram (2010), and Snapchat (2011), along with a parallel mass accumulation of wealth at the upper strata of society – and a subsequent sociological fallout deeply rooted in our access to such invasive, addictive, and borderline narcissistic networking technologies. Today we can state without doubt that the ability for individuals to circulate content globally has forever altered international trade, politics, and even law. At its root, that ability has also drastically affected visual culture.

 

In the same way that photocopying marked a departure from print media in the 1970s – photocopiers democratized and made approachable an otherwise oft-overlooked creative and/or documentary method – smartphones and their front-facing-camera brethren have revolutionized the art of viewing and depicting the self and world.[1] As such, our most effective bellwether for cultural shifts and changes in photography today may be Instagram: the office bulletin board equivalent of the 21st century. On Instagram, angles, filters, and tags compose curated posts and profiles that define not just certain users, but a generation of ad infinitum networking. Corresponding ‘comments’ drift in a sea of ‘friends’ (and strangers alike), and hashtags allow content to resurface long after sinking to the bottom of a feed. All this detritus tells the observant web surfer where tastes are changing and defines distinct eras. Whereas photographs of the 1980s can be characterized by pastel palettes, rounded edges, and fades, in the 21st century style changes don’t happen every decade – they happen every few months.[2] Simply scroll through an Instagram profile to encounter 2014 photos edited with vignettes, 2015 ones with Valencia filters, and most recently, hyper-saturated and high definition landscape and panoramic shots.[3] Indeed, increased access to photography through smartphones has ushered in a new generation of understanding the image, where would-be stylistic tidal waves are normalized within the ocean of culture, and content becomes dated before it’s released. Surprisingly, seismic shifts in visual culture like the ones we’ve witnessed since the dawn of the internet are as of yet largely absent content within contemporary art.

 

Enter: Charlie Stein. This artist, born into pre-fall of the Wall Germany and raised during the German Reunion, studied visual art theory and practice at the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart and Munich under professors Christian Jankowski, Rainer Ganahl, and Gerhard Merz. Stein’s formal education in critical thinking opened the doors to her multimedia practice today. Whether a painting, comic strip, or paper cup, Stein’s work complicates fundamental artistic media with oxymoronic subject matter. This manifests most recently in her series of self portraits entitled Digitale Entwerdung (Digital Annihilation).

 

Few art historical concepts are more impersonal than the figurative self portrait. To see what an artist sees through the depiction of her landscape or as seen in historical paintings is to step inside a perspective – but to decode how an artist portrays herself is another pursuit entirely. Even widely acclaimed self portraitists (Van Gogh and Munch come to mind) betray at best an artist’s isolation-induced self-reproach. After all, it is a universal human experience to never see one’s own figure head on. Thus figurative self portraiture is most related to, at its most fundamental level, the perceptions of others.

 

The inception of front-facing cameras fundamentally altered the trajectory of self portraiture in everyday life. Today, the majority of the first world owns a smartphone – and with it, a camera. Smartphones catalyzed the boom of social networks more so than any other technological device – Instagram alone grew from 100 to 700 million users over the last four years.[4] Impulses to snap selfies while on exotic trips, post about travel plans, and ‘like’ advertisements from one’s favorite celebrities have proven to be not just inescapable, but noxious – especially for children. Today, the female body’s vulnerability in the wake of social media is rapidly becoming a very real societal concern.[5] Stein uses these social and art historical conditions as a point of departure in her self portraiture, taking advantage of new technologies for self portrayal while referencing both their far-reaching impacts on culture and roots in art history.

 

Stein’s portraits-cum-cultural critique are difficult to unpack in one sitting, and – I’ve found – are most rewarding when two vantage points are explored: content and medium. Stein’s paintings begin on her phone, on which she takes a photo of her face using either Snapchat or Instagram. From there, Stein filters, cuts, and collages her face onto itself, often mixing and layering her anatomy. It is not unusual for Stein’s compositions to include six eyes, five ears, or a set of double noses, in a clear nod to both Francis Bacon and Pablo Picasso. Stein’s work at this stage sometimes involves a moving-image component, vibrating with off-kilter blinks, nostril flares, and tongue wiggles. Stein’s aesthetics present her features from various angles as a reference to portraiture across genre – from police mug shots, where right profile, full-face, and three-quarter view are all taken for a full understanding of the person at hand, to mythology, in which Janus, Roman god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, and endings, is depicted as having two faces, referencing sight into both the future and to the past.

 

Once her composition is complete, Stein compresses her video into a single iconic image which is ultimately transcribed with paint on canvas. Stein paints loosely when rendering her final image, accentuating characteristics specific to the medium of paint while paying homage to portraits past – or, let’s clarify – male portraits by male artists past.[6] Here her work takes a political turn. “I noticed that men too often mistook the softness in my paintings as some sort of invitation to critique my ability”, Stein says about her work. “I realized the importance of continuing that style to break down hundreds of years of cultural barriers and value judgments made by men for men. Just because it’s always been a certain way doesn’t mean that’s the right way.” And indeed, while the stylistic choice to forego photorealism in her paintings is easy to brush off on first glance as a lack of skill, it’s a marked departure from the European norm of artist as connoisseur or artisan, and a pointed rejection of the [male] canon as the standard for painters to strive towards. Stein paints in the here and now, reminding viewers that she exists as an artist not to make up for lost time or compete with male portraiture of the last three thousand years, but to paint alongside the greats of today.

 

Upon first look, Digitale Entwerdung works are not entirely self evident. Interest in how Stein comes about these compositions, or why, is a secondary reaction to the works, after a guttural feeling of distaste towards a subject who simultaneously disrupts and situates herself within the history of female portraiture, and who presents as a grotesque ‘other’ rather than an extension of viewer desire. Stein purposely appropriates first and foremost the social networking filters most often used for beautification – these filters reduce blemishes, enlarge eyes, and add artificial makeup to idealize the female form. When collaged onto themselves, however, the effect is not, in this case, a dream woman – rather it’s a refraction of those ideals into a new non-traditionally-beautiful form. In this way, Stein innovates by invoking abhorrence with filters engineered to depict desire. Stein’s deviation is especially pertinent because beautification filters are increasingly accepted on social networks as reality. As of this writing, female body image and weight-related mental illnesses are on the rise and increasingly linked to access to social media, as teen girls look in the mirror and see pimpled, mis-proportioned human beings rather than photoshopped and filtered Instagram-ready stock models.[7] Just think – Stein’s surreal self portrayal, otherworldly and demented, hinges on a tool that has worked its way under the radar into Western cultural norms. Why is it that such filters are taken for reality when they make others look beautiful, and pushed aside as surreal when they make others look ugly? Indeed, Stein’s work ruminates on the surreal in everyday life, and our instinctive optimization of culture at large – i.e. ‘the grass is always greener’ mentality. That is to say, a belief in social media as an accurate representational reality is linked to toxic advertising schemes and fake news reports, with a large majority of these practices stemming from well-circulated altered or non-representational figurative photography.[8]

 

That photography does not have a 1:1 relationship with reality is a concept as old as the medium itself, explored by pioneering artists from László Moholy-Nagy to Gordon Matta Clark. Yet this fact is also irreconcilable in the human brain: it goes against our understanding of the world to take a photograph as false documentation.[9] Those who understand this fundamental human flaw in perception wield a very real power over society. In fact, one cannot ignore – given Stein’s German heritage – that the most egregious abuse of this mental loophole to date was by Adolf Hitler, who not only encouraged but invested in the spread of the hand-held camera in Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany in order to pull off a massive propaganda campaign.[10] Hitler understood that once every citizen could photograph, photos would be viewed as largely credible – allowing state-altered photography to circulate unquestioned.[11] Stein, a German born and raised, addresses this cognitive dissonance by transposing her photos through paint, allowing viewers to work backwards from their facticity to their photography-based origins, rather than forwards in a trajectory that often ends before its climax. Which is to say that viewers rarely realize the extent to which photographic documents are altered. Simply by reducing the realism of her product, Stein exposes the mechanism of filtering on Instagram as one equally as nonrepresentational as painting – after all, didn’t Baroque court painters famously thin and perfect their subjects?[12] Stein takes the toxic portraiture culture that we perceive as our reality today, and exposes it for what it is: surrealism.

 

Perpendicular to Stein’s study of photographic media runs her exploration of the contemporary male gaze and the history of female portraiture. Thus if we can understand her work’s manifestation in paint as exposing the history of photography-as-propaganda, we can understand its content as self portraiture through a discussion on the viewer’s relationship to the work.

 

Stein’s portraits are cropped at the bust or higher, largely desexualizing her as a female subject. The fantastical compositions of her facial features, moreover, render her as alien rather than human within her work. As if this weren’t enough, Stein exhibits paintings in installation-like groups, sometimes overwhelming rooms with scores of different contortions of her face upon a single wall.

 

Anyone who has been to the Louvre knows the feeling of looking up at a 30-foot wall hung salon-style with figurative paintings, and sinking into the floor as a distinct feeling of insignificance takes root. The male gaze in such an environment ceases to exist, as one can only look in so many directions at once. The late bloom of the museum in visual culture was a direct consequence of this phenomenon:[13] Paris salons of the 19th century – to which the Louvre is immeasurably indebted – presented opportunities to buy individual works, which were placed in private homes. That is to say, museum-style exhibitions did not allow for portrait viewing in the same way that private ownership did, and 19th century female portraiture was born more for the latter purpose.[14] Much like she takes advantage of photography as a non-representational medium, Stein riffs off of the Paris Salon as an exhibition history, and the human nature it revealed: rather than blocking the male gaze with a fully abstracted work as early 20th century female painters attempted to do, Stein throws it back: five hundred deformed blonde faces, all similar yet different, staring back at the viewer as if to say I can see you but you can’t see me – and I know it.

 

Also in the realm of content is everything that Stein’s work is not. Stein paints a blonde white woman – a subject in the company of Botticelli’s Venus, Manet’s bar tender of the Folies-Bergère, and Warhol’s Marilyn. Perhaps a more apt relationship to mine as portrayal of the [blonde] self as other exists within the work of Cindy Sherman. But when is a portrait of a blonde girl just a portrait of a blonde girl? In Scandinavia, where blond is a visual norm? Or in cinema in the art historically referencing movie ‘The Girl with the Pearl Earring’ via the beautiful half Danish, Jewish and Catholic New Yorker, Scarlett Johannson?

 

Stein’s grotesque works reflect on the dirty blonde: poor whites and privilege both come to mind with the term dirty, which doesn’t make much sense as does the color strawberry-blonde. But perhaps these terms take a license of their own? In Stein’s work, what’s represented is neither Cinderella blonde nor the dirty blonde, but platinum blonde, like baby hair. Unlike the aloof humor of the babies, however, Stein depicts herself with a cold dignity. Maybe this is a point of tension, considering her oeuvre which often encourages viewer participation and interview-based research? Maybe it’s a reflection of the viewer’s mindset upon seeing an unfamiliar human form? Perhaps both, or it is open-ended as such, expanding its capacities for reverberation and relationality.

 

The so called ‘American Beauty’ (blonde hair, blue eyes) is another trope one could add, but we can plainly see the clownish exaggeration of features in Stein’s work that defies this standard.[15] On top of that, the so-called American Beauty is newly out of style, with respondents to surveys of beauty identifying mixed-race women as the epitome of beauty since 2011.[16] This antiquated beauty ideal reminds us of Stein’s debts to forefathers in beauty standard provocation like Koons, Warhol, Lichtenstein, and other contemporary and classical ‘pop’ artists alike. Clearly Stein draws from her peers as inspiration, and as such is an extension thereof.

 

As blonde hair becomes more of a trend than a characteristic, reactions to the democratization of physical attributes abound as one might expect. As Black Lives Matter reverberates through the United States, and refugee intake rocks the EU, a defiant pair of ponytails show up in New York and Calabasas.[17] And whether at the Kardashians’ house or Villa Merkel, hopefully both spaces remind us that what exists persists unless we confront it, talk about it, process it, re-iconize it and celebrate it – on the streets of Berlin or L.A. as much as in the museum.[18]

 

Does Stein’s work free her of identity politics, as a watershed? Francis Bacon remarked to David Sylvester in 1975, “I loathe my own face. . . . I’ve done a lot of self-portraits, really because people have been dying around me like flies and I’ve nobody else left to paint but myself.”[19] In Bacon’s striking triptych, Three Studies for a Self Portrait, his head emerges from a deep abyss of black paint, providing no sense of the space inhabited by the sitter. This tightly constricted view allows only for ruminations on the face itself: its ravages, its deep psychological depths, and the sense of turning around it slowly, going from one frame to the next, as if in a languorous panning shot. The same could be said of Stein’s work, with the addendum that the female subject and subjectivity involved position these works as uniquely self-conscious.

 

As visual media and contemporary art proceed into wider electronic forums, art about art (about art) becomes an expansive echo. This din of fanfare around ‘Art’ (or DJing, party photography, or any prior turn of the millennium social trend) proliferates a social appreciation of art as an idea, effort, or cultural signifier, while drowning out more nuanced voices of critical, current art that push consciousness deeper rather than wider.

 

The time to review the turn of the millennium swells amidst the breaking waves of an original and global acculturation of the Real. In order for interpretations of human consciousness and feminist ideology to penetrate the sphere of ‘high culture,’ society as an institution must adapt to information-based modes of creation and consumption without hierarchies of labor and wealth: something Stein aims to catalyze with her self portraiture. Using filters that equalize subjects and objects alike, Stein subverts a medium as of yet absent in contemporary art, asking her viewer to traverse the distance between the selfie-stick and the self, and examine her paintings with the same immediacy as one would an Instagram photo.

 

Works Cited

Brown, David Alan. “Leonardo and the Idealized Portrait in Milan.” Arte Lombarda, No. 67, 1983. p 102-116.

Harper, Bernard and Latto, Richard. “The Non-Realistic Nature of Photography: Further Reasons Why Turner Was Wrong.” Leonardo, Vol. 40 No. 3, 2007. p 243-247.

Dawson, Alene. “What is beauty and who has it?” CNN, June 29, 2011. Online. http://edition.cnn.com/2011/LIVING/06/29/global.beauty.culture/index.html, accessed Feb 17 2018.

Eveleth, Rose. “How fake images change our memory and behavior.” BBC Future, December 13, 2012. Online. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20121213-fake-pictures-make-real-memories, accessed Feb 17 2018.

Gu, Yi. “What’s in a Name? Photography and the Reinvention of Visual Truth in China, 1840-1911.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 95 No. 1, March 2013. p 120-138.

Guerin, Frances. Through Amateur Eyes: Film and Photography in Nazi Germany. “Amateur Film in Nazi Germany.” University of Minnesota Press. November 30, 2011. USA. p 29-32

Janis, Carroll. “IS IT, OR ISN’T IT?” Notes in the History of Art, Vol. 24 No. 2, Winter 2005. Online. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/sou.24.2.23208117, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Lin, Summer. “Kim Kardashian Just Dyed Her Hair Platinum Blonde Again.” Elle, September 6. 2017. Online. http://www.elle.com/beauty/a12185549/kim-kardashian-platinum-blonde-again/, acessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Plagens, Peter. “Some Problems in Recent Painting.” Art Journal, Vol. 30 No. 2, Winter 1970-1971. Online. https://www.jstor.org/stable/775430, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Shelton, Andrew Carrington. “Art, Politics, and the Politics of Art: Ingres’s “Saint Symphorien” at the 1834 Salon.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 83 No. 4. p 711-739.

 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art. “Francis Bacon: Three Studies for a Self Portrait.” Online. https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/489966, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Thompson, Clive. “How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked – And Played.” Smithsonian Magazine, March 2015. Online. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/duplication-nation-3D-printing-rise-180954332/, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Twenge, Jean M. “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” The Atlantic, September 2017. Online. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphone-destroyed-a-generation/534198/, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Vitelli, Romeo. “Media Exposure and the ‘Perfect Body.’” Psychology Today, November 2013. Online. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/media-spotlight/201311/media-exposure-and-the-perfect-body, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

de Vries, Dian A. “Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model.” Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 45 No. 1, January 2016. Online. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698286/, accessed Feb 17 2018.

Footnotes

[1] For an analysis on the photocopier’s societal impact see Thompson, Clive. “How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked – And Played.” Smithsonian Magazine, March 2015.

[2] See William Eggleston’s photographs – heralded as pioneers for the recognition of color photography as fine art, these works paved the way for twenty years of similar aesthetics in color photography. Today many works can be dated by sight because of how closely they adhere to Eggleston’s aesthetics.

[3] As of writing in 2017 (subject to change – and quickly!) [Diese Fußnote verstehe ich überhaupt nicht besser wäre doch Stand 2017 oder so]

[4] For a description of “the twin rise of the smartphone and social media” see Twenge, Jean M. “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” The Atlantic, September 2017. Online. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphone-destroyed-a-generation/534198/, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

[5] See Vitelli, Romeo. “Media Exposure and the ‘Perfect Body.’” Psychology Today, November 2013. Online. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/media-spotlight/201311/media-exposure-and-the-perfect-body, accessed Feb 17 2018.

[6] Here with “characteristics specific to the medium of paint” I refer to limitations to and strengths of paint as a means of representation – when compared to photography, for example, which is clearly more capable of documenting a likeness to reality. For an brief introduction to this realm of art theory., see Janis, Carroll. “IS IT, OR ISN’T IT?” Notes in the History of Art, Vol. 24 No. 2, Winter 2005. Online. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/sou.24.2.23208117,

accessed Feb 17 2018 and Plagens, Peter. “Some Problems in Recent Painting.” Art Journal, Vol. 30 No. 2, Winter 1970-1971. Online. https://www.jstor.org/stable/775430, accessed Feb 17 2018.

[7] See de Vries, Dian A. “Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model.” Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 45 No. 1, January 2016. Online. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698286/, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

[8] See Eveleth, Rose. “How fake images change our memory and behavior.” BBC Future, December 13, 2012. Online. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20121213-fake-pictures-make-real-memories,

accessed Feb 17 2018.

[9] This is a complex psychological issue that has been exploited for hundreds of years to control the behavior of consumers. See Harper, Bernard and Latto, Richard. “The Non-Realistic Nature of Photography: Further Reasons Why Turner Was Wrong.” Leonardo, Vol. 40 No. 3, 2007. p 243-247,

Gu, Yi. “What’s in a Name? Photography and the Reinvention of Visual Truth in China, 1840-1911.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 95 No. 1, March 2013. p 120-138, and Guerin, Frances. Through Amateur Eyes: Film and Photography in Nazi Germany. “Amateur Film in Nazi Germany.” University of Minnesota Press. November 30, 2011. USA. p 29-32. Guerin’s study is discussed further in the following sections.

[10] See Guerin.

[11] Ibid.

[12] Velasquez also famously did not partake in this practice. See Brown, David Alan. “Leonardo and the Idealized Portrait in Milan.” Arte Lombarda, No. 67, 1983. p 102-116.

 

[13] That is to say, our inability to objectify women when presented with a discordant crowd of them.

[14] See Shelton, Andrew Carrington. “Art, Politics, and the Politics of Art: Ingres’s “Saint Symphorien” at the 1834 Salon.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 83 No. 4. p 711-739.

[15] See Dawson, Alene. “What is beauty and who has it?” CNN, June 29, 2011. Online. http://edition.cnn.com/2011/LIVING/06/29/global.beauty.culture/index.html, accessed Feb 17 2018.

[16] Ibid.

[17] For the details of this reference, which alludes to Kim Kardashian – a public figure and fashion icon known for her physique, business acumen, and slick dark hair – dying her hair blonde see Lin, Summer. “Kim Kardashian Just Dyed Her Hair Platinum Blonde Again.” Elle, September 6. 2017. Online. http://www.elle.com/beauty/a12185549/kim-kardashian-platinum-blonde-again/, acessed Feb 17 2018.

[18] This discussion on Stein as a blonde subject was borne from a conversation with Patrick Meagher, one of Stein’s colleagues.

[19] See The Metropolitan Museum of Art. “Francis Bacon: Three Studies for a Self Portrait.” Online. https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/489966, accessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Deutsch:

 

SELENA PARNON

Charlie Stein: Das Selbstportrait als informationsbasierte Kulturkritik

 

Seit der Jahrtausendwende haben die Industriestaaten den Aufstieg von Facebook (2005), Instagram (2010) und Snapchat (2011) gepaart mit der parallelen Anhäufung von Reichtum in den oberen Schichten der Gesellschaft miterlebt – damit verbunden, die dadurch resultierenden negativen soziologischen Konsequenzen – Konsequenzen, die tief verwurzelt sind mit solch invasiven, suchterzeugenden und grenzwertig-narzisstischen Netzwerktechnologien. Heute können wir ohne Zweifel feststellen, dass die Fähigkeit des Einzelnen, Inhalte weltweit zu verbreiten, den internationalen Handel, die Politik und sogar das Recht zu beeinflussen für immer verändert hat. Durch diese Entwicklungen hat sich die visuelle Kultur in ihrem Kern grundlegendend gewandelt

 

Auf die selbe Weise, wie die Technologie des Fotokopierens in den 1970er Jahren eine Abkehr von den Printmedien bedeutete – Fotokopierer demokratisierten und erleichterten den Zugang zu dem ansonsten oft übersehenen kreativen und/oder dokumentarischen Schaffen – haben Smartphones mit ihren Frontkameras die Kunst des Betrachtens und Darstellens des eigenen Selbst und das der Welt revolutioniert[1]. In diesem Sinne kann Instagram durchaus als einer der wirksamsten Indikatoren für kulturelle Verlagerungen und Veränderungen in der heutigen Fotografie gewertet werden: als Äquivalent zu einem schwarzen Brett das dem 21. Jahrhundert entspricht. Auf Instagram werden mit Winkeln, Filtern und Tags kuratierte Posts und Profile erstellt, die nicht nur bestimmte Nutzer, sondern eine ganze Generation von ad-infinitum-Netzwerken definieren.

 

Entsprechende „Kommentare“ treiben umher in einem Meer von „Freunden“ (und Fremden gleichermaßen) und Hashtags erlauben es Inhalten, immer wieder aufzutauchen auch lange nachdem sie schon auf den Grund eines Feeds gesunken sind. All dieser Detritus erzählt dem aufmerksamen Internetsurfer, wo Geschmäcker sich verändern und definiert bestimmte Epochen. Während sich die Fotografien der 1980er Jahre durch Pastelltöne, abgerundete Kanten und Fading auszeichnen, vollziehen sich die Stilwechsel des 21. Jahrhunderts nicht mehr alle zehn Jahre, sondern finden alle paar Monate statt.[2] Einfaches Scrollen durch ein Instagram-Profil genügt, um auf die typischen, mit Vignetten bearbeiteten Fotos von 2014 zu stoßen, dann auf die von 2015 mit Valencia-Filtern bearbeiteten und zuletzt auf die Fotos hypergesättigter und hochauflösender Landschafts- und Panoramaaufnahmen zu treffen[3]. In der Tat hat ein verstärkter Zugang zu Fotografie durch die Verbreitung von Smartphones eine neue Ära des Verständnisses des Bildes eingeleitet, in der sich die vermeintlichen stilistischen Flutwellen innerhalb des Ozeans der Kultur normalisieren und Inhalte bereits vor ihrer Veröffentlichung veraltet sind. Überraschenderweise sind seismische Verschiebungen in der visuellen Kultur, wie wir sie seit dem Beginn des Internets beobachten konnten, in der zeitgenössischen Kunst noch weitgehend absent.

 

Auftritt: Charlie Stein. Die vor dem Mauerfall geborene und während der deutschen Wiedervereinigung aufgewachsene Künstlerin studierte Freie Kunst an den Staatlichen Akademien der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart und München bei den Professoren Christian Jankowski, Rainer Ganahl und Gerhard Merz. Es war Steins formale Ausbildung in kritischem Denken, die ihr die Tür zu ihrer heutigen multimedialen Praxis eröffnete. Ob Gemälde, Comic oder Pappbecher; Steins Arbeit verkompliziert grundlegende künstlerische Medien mit oxymoronischen Themen. Dies zeigt sich zuletzt in ihrer Serie von Selbstporträts mit dem Titel Digitale Entwerdung (Digital Annihilation).

 

Nur wenige kunsthistorische Konzepte sind unpersönlicher als das figurative Selbstportrait. Das zu sehen, was ein Künstler sieht, durch das Abbilden einer Landschaft oder wie in historischen Gemälden, ist so, als beträte man eine Perspektive – aber zu entschlüsseln, wie sich ein Künstler selbst darstellt, ist ein völlig anderes Unterfangen. Selbst weithin gelobte Schöpfer von Selbstbildnissen (man denke an Van Gogh und Munch) verleugnen bestenfalls die isolationsbedingten Selbstvorwürfe eines Künstlers. Schließlich ist es doch eine universelle menschliche Erfahrung, niemals wirklich die eigene Figur frontal vor sich zu sehen zu können. So ist das figurative Selbstportrait, auf seiner fundamentalsten Ebene, am stärksten mit den Wahrnehmungen anderer Menschen verbunden.

 

 

Mit der Einführung der Frontkamera hat sich der Entwicklungsverlauf des Selbstporträts im alltäglichen Leben grundlegend verändert. Heute besitzt die Mehrheit der Industrieländer ein Smartphone – ein mit Kamera ausgestattetes Smartphone?. Smartphones haben den Boom sozialer Netzwerke mehr als jedes andere technische Gerät beschleunigt. – Instagram allein ist in den letzten vier Jahren von 100 auf 700 Millionen Nutzer angewachsen[4]. Impulse, Selfies auf exotischen Reisen zu knipsen, Reisepläne zu posten und Werbungen von beliebten Promis zu „liken“, haben sich nicht nur als unausweichlich, sondern auch als schädlich erwiesen – besonders für Kinder. Heute wird die Verletzlichkeit des weiblichen Körpers im Sog der sozialen Medien zu einem äußerst realen gesellschaftlichen Problem[5]. Stein nutzt diese sozialen Bedingungen als Ausgangspunkt für ihre Selbstportraits, indem sie sich neue Technologien zur Selbstdarstellung zu Nutze macht und dabei sowohl auf deren weitreichenden Auswirkungen auf die Kultur verweist als auch auf deren Wurzeln in der Kunstgeschichte.

 

 

Stein’s portraits are difficult to unpack in one sitting, and – I’ve found – are most rewarding when two vantage points are explored: content and medium. Stein’s paintings begin on her phone, on which she takes a photo of her face using either Snapchat or Instagram. From there, Stein filters, cuts, and collages her face onto itself, often mixing and layering her anatomy. It is not unusual for Stein’s compositions to include six eyes, five ears, or a set of double noses, in a clear nod to both Francis Bacon and Pablo Picasso. Stein’s work at this stage sometimes involves a moving-image component, vibrating with off-kilter blinks, nostril flares, and tongue wiggles. Stein’s aesthetics present her features from various angles as a reference to portraiture across genre – from police mug shots, where right profile, full-face, and three-quarter view are all taken for a full understanding of the person at hand, to mythology, in which Janus, Roman god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, and endings, is depicted as having two faces, referencing sight into both the future and to the past.

 

Steins Porträts lassen sich nur schwer in einer einzigen Sitzung entschlüsseln und sind m.E. am einträglichsten, wenn zwei Betrachtungsweisen gleichermaßen erforscht werden: Inhalt und Medium. Steins Bilder beginnen auf dem Display ihres Smartphones, mit dem sie unter Benutzung von Snapchat oder Instagram ein Foto ihres Gesichts macht. Von da an filtert, schneidet und collagiert sie ihr Gesicht, vermischt und schichtet dabei ihre Anatomie. Es ist nicht ungewöhnlich, dass Steins Kompositionen sechs Augen, fünf Ohren oder doppelte Nasen aufweisen und damit als Anspielungen auf Francis Bacon und Pablo Picasso gesehen werden können. In diesem Stadium beinhaltet Steins Arbeit manchmal eine Bewegtbild-Komponente, die mit zuckendem Blinzeln, flatternden Nasenlöchern und Zungen-Schlägen vibriert. Steins präsentiert ihre Gesichtszüge aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln als Referenz zu genreübergreifenden Portraits: von Polizeifotografien, in denen Profil-, Frontal- und Dreiviertelansicht für das vollständige Verständnis der Person dienen, hin zu Bildnissen der Mythologie, wie Janus, der römische Gott der Anfänge, Eingänge, Übergänge, Zeit, Dualität, Portale, Durchgänge und Endungen, dargestellt mit zwei Gesichtern, die für den gleichzeitigen Blick in die Zukunft als auch in die Vergangenheit stehen.
Sobald ihre Komposition abgeschlossen ist, komprimiert Stein ihr Video in ein einziges ikonisches Bild, das schließlich mit Farbe auf Leinwand übersetzt wird. Stein malt mit lockerem Duktus bei der Wiedergabe ihres endgültigen Bildes, akzentuiert so die spezifischen Eigenschaften des Mediums Malerei. Sie huldigt dabei Portraits aus der Vergangenheit – genauer gesagt, männlichen Portraits von männlichen Künstlern[6]. Hier nimmt ihre Arbeit eine politische Wende. „Mir ist aufgefallen, dass Männer das Verletzliche meiner Bilder allzu oft als eine Art Einladung zur Kritik meines Könnens missverstanden haben“, sagt Stein über ihre Arbeit. „Ich erkannte dadurch, wie wichtig es ist, diesen Stil beizubehalten, um hunderte von Jahren kultureller Barrieren und Werturteilen von Männern für Männer zu durchbrechen. Nur weil es bisher immer so gemacht wurde, heißt das nicht, dass es der richtige Weg ist.“ Und tatsächlich, während die stilistische Entscheidung, in ihren Gemälden auf Fotorealismus zu verzichten, für das ungeschulte Auge als Mangel an Können abgetan werden könnte, ist dies eine deutliche Abkehr von der europäischen Norm des Künstlers als Experte oder Handwerker und eine pointierte Ablehnung des [männlichen] Kanons als erstrebenswerten Standard für Maler. Stein malt im Hier und Jetzt und erinnert die Betrachter daran, dass sie als Künstlerin existiert, nicht um die verlorene Zeit aufzuholen oder mit der männlichen Porträtmalerei der letzten 3.000 Jahre in direkte Konkurrenz zu treten, sondern um auf Augenhöhe mit den Großen der Gegenwart zu malen.

 

 

Auf den ersten Blick sind die Arbeiten der Serie Digitale Entwerdung nicht völlig selbsterklärend. Das Interesse daran, wie Stein zu diesen Kompositionen kommt oder warum, ist eine sekundäre Reaktion auf die Werke, die einem unbestimmten Gefühl der Abneigung gegenüber einem Subjekt folgt, welches die Geschichte der weiblichen Porträtmalerei aufrüttelt, während es sich in ihr situiert und sich dort vielmehr als ein groteskes Anderes präsentiert als eine Erweiterung des Begehrens des Betrachters. In erster Linie eignet sich Stein die Filter sozialer Netzwerke an, die wohl am gebräuchlichsten für Verschönerungen verwendet werden. Diese Filter reduzieren Hautunreinheiten, vergrößern die Augen und fügen künstliches Make-up hinzu, um die weibliche Form zu idealisieren. Wenn sie jedoch auf sich selbst collagiert werden, ist die Wirkung in diesem Fall keine Traumfrau. Vielmehr wird dieses Ideal gebrochen um eine neue, nicht traditionell schöne Form zu erzeugen. Stein ist innovativ, indem sie Abscheu durch die Verwendung dieser Filter hervorruft, die einzig dazu entwickelt wurden um Begehren zu erwecken. Diese Umnutzung durch Stein ist besonders relevant, weil Verschönerungsfilter in sozialen Netzwerken zunehmend als Realität akzeptiert werden. Gegenwärtig sind weibliche Körperbilder und gewichtsbezogene psychische Erkrankungen auf dem Vormarsch und zunehmend mit dem Zugang zu sozialen Medien verbunden, da der Blick in den Spiegel, weiblichen Teenager verpickelte, schlecht proportionierte Menschen offenbart anstelle von retouchierten und gefilterteten „Instagram-fertigen“ Internetmodels.[7] Das Faszinierende ist dabei, dass Steins surreale Selbstdarstellungen, jenseitig und wahnsinnig, einem Werkzeug geschuldet sind, dem es gelungen ist sich unbemerkt in die visuelle Norm westlicher Kultur einzuschleichen. Warum werden solche Filter für die Realität gehalten, solange sie jemanden schön erscheinen lassen und als surreal beiseitegeschoben, sobald sie jemanden hässlich aussehen lassen? In der Tat hinterfragt Steins Arbeit sowohl das Surreale des Alltags als auch generell die instinktive Optimierungskultur unserer Gesellschaft – im Sinne einer „Das Gras auf der anderen Seite ist immer grüner“- Mentalität. Das heißt, der Glaube an soziale Medien als akkurate Repräsentation der Realität ist verbunden mit schädlichen Werbekampagnen und Pseudo-Nachrichten, wobei sich die große Mehrheit dieser Praktiken aus der viral verbreiteten, veränderten oder nichtrepräsentativen figurativen Fotografie speist.[8]

 

Dass Fotografie keine exakte 1:1 Abbildung der Realität ist, ist ein Konzept so alt ist wie das Medium selbst, das von wegweisenden Künstlern wie László Moholy-Nagy bis hin zu Gordon Matta Clark erforscht wurde. Und trotzdem ist diese Tatsache im menschlichen Gehirn unvereinbar: Es widerspricht unserem Verständnis der Welt, eine Fotografie für ein falsches Dokument zu halten.[9] Diejenigen, die diesen fundamentalen menschlichen Fehler in der Wahrnehmung verstehen, haben eine sehr reale Macht über die Gesellschaft. In der Tat kann man – angesichts des deutschen Erbes Steins – nicht ignorieren, dass Adolf Hitler, der die Verbreitung der Handkamera in der Weimarer Republik und im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland nicht nur förderte, sondern auch in sie investierte, und damit eben diesen Fehler in der Wahrnehmung dazu missbrauchte, um seine massiven Propagandakampagnen durchzuführen.[10] Hitler hatte verstanden, dass, sobald jeder Bürger erst einmal mit dieser Technik vertraut sein würde, fotografische Dokumente als weitgehend glaubwürdig angesehen werden würden. Dies erlaubte, dass staatlich gefälschte Fotografie unangefochten zirkulieren konnte.[11] Stein, eine in Deutschland geborene und aufgewachsene Künstlerin, wendet sich dieser kognitiven Dissonanz zu, indem sie ihre Fotos durch Farbe transponiert und den Betrachtern ermöglicht, rückwärts von ihrer Faktizität aus zu ihrer fotografischen Herkunft zu gehen, statt auf einer linearen Zeitschiene, die vor ihrem Höhepunkt endet. Das heißt, dass die Betrachter selten erkennen, in welchem ​​Umfang fotografische Dokumente verändert werden. Indem sie den Realismus ihres Resultats reduziert, entlarvt Stein den Mechanismus des Filterns auf Instagram als ebenso wenig repräsentativ wie Malerei selbst – dennn haben nicht schon die Hofmaler des Barocks ihre Modelle verschönert und perfektioniert?[12] Stein nimmt die toxische Kultur des Selbstportraitierens, die wir heute als unsere Realität wahrnehmen, und entlarvt sie als das, was sie ist: Surrealismus.

 

Aufbauend auf ihrem Studium der fotografischen Medien vollzieht Stein ihre Erforschung des zeitgenössischen männlichen Blicks und die Geschichte der weiblichen Porträtmalerei. Wenn wir also die Manifestation ihrer Arbeit in Malerei als die Entlarvung der Geschichte der Fotografie als Propaganda verstehen, können wir ihren Inhalt als Selbstportrait durch eine Diskussion über die Beziehung des Betrachters zur Arbeit begreifen.

 

Steins Porträts sind oberhalb der Brust oder höher beschnitten, was sie als weibliches Subjekt weitgehend entsexualisiert. Die fantastischen Kompositionen ihrer Gesichtszüge lassen sie zudem eher fremdartig als menschlich erscheinen. Als ob das nicht genug wäre, zeigt Stein ihre Gemälde in installationsähnlichen Anordnungen, manchmal in überwältigenden Räumen mit unzähligen verschiedenen Verrenkungen ihres Gesichts auf einer einzigen Wand.

 

Wer schon einmal den Louvre besucht hat, kennt vielleicht das Gefühl, das einen beschleicht, wenn man an einer 10 Meter hohen Wand hinaufblickt, auf der figurative Gemälden salonartig angeordnet sind, und einen eine deutliche Ahnung der eigenen Bedeutungslosigkeit beschleicht. In solch einer Umgebung hört der männliche Blick auf zu existieren, da man nur in eine begrenzte Anzahl von Richtungen gleichzeitig schauen kann. Die späte Blütezeit des Museums in der visuellen Kultur war eine direkte Konsequenz eben dieses Phänomens[13]: Es ist den Pariser Salons des 19. Jahrhunderts geschuldet – denen der Louvre sich verpflichtet sehen muss – dass sich Individuen auf einmal die Möglichkeit bot, einzelne Werke zu kaufen, die dann in Privatwohnungen platziert wurden. Das heißt, die damaligen Ausstellungen im musealen Stil erlaubten nicht auf die selbe Weise das Betrachten von Portraits wie es im Privatbesitz üblicherweise geschah, und die weibliche Porträtmalerei des 19. Jahrhunderts war mehr für diesen Zweck geschaffen worden. Ähnlich wie sie die Fotografie als nicht-gegenständliches Medium ausnutzt, bedient sich Stein der Klaviatur des Pariser Salons als Sinnbild der Ausstellungsgeschichte und verweist damit auf die menschliche Natur, die der Salon enthüllte. Anstatt den männlichen Blick mit einem völlig abstrakten Kunstwerke wie die Malerinnen des frühen 20. Jahrhunderts auszuhebeln versucht Stein den Blick umzukehren : fünfhundert deformierte blonde Gesichter, alle ähnlich und doch anders, starren den Betrachter an, als wollten sie sagen: Ich sehe dich, aber du kannst mich nicht sehen – und ich weiß es.

 
Es gilt auch sich den impliziten Inhalten zu widmen, die durch eine bewusste Auslassung über Steins Arbeit Auskunft geben. Stein malt eine blonde weiße Frau; ein Thema, das sich in der Gesellschaft von Botticellis Venus, Manets Barfrau der Folies-Bergère und Warhols Marilyn befindet. Vielleicht existiert eine passendere Beziehung als zu dieser Darstellung des [blonden] Selbst, wie sie innerhalb von Cindy Shermans Werk existiert. Aber wann ist ein Porträt eines blonden Mädchens nur ein Porträt eines blonden Mädchens? In Skandinavien, wo blond die visuelle Norm ist? Oder im Kino im kunsthistorisch referenzierenden Film „Das Mädchen mit dem Perlenohrring“, welches von der schönen, halb-dänischen, jüdischen, katholischen New Yorkerin Scarlett Johannson dargestellt wird?

 

Steins groteske Arbeiten reflektieren die Idee von „dirty blonde“: Sowohl arme als auch privilegierte Weiße kommen einem in den Sinn bei dem Begriff „dirty“, was genauso viel oder wenig Sinn ergibt wie die Farbe „Erdbeerblond (strawberry blonde)“. Aber vielleicht bergen diese Begriffe eine ihnen ganz eigene Daseinsberechtigung? In Steins Arbeiten wird weder „Cinderella“-blond noch „Dirty“-blond dargestellt, sondern Platinblond, ähnlich dem Haar von Babies. Im Gegensatz zu dem albernen Humor von Kleinkindern stellt sich Stein jedoch mit würdevoller Kälte dar. Vielleicht ist das ein Spannungsverhältnis, wenn man ihr komplettes Œuvre bedenkt, das oft die Beteiligung von Zuschauern und interviewbasierte Forschung miteinschließt? Vielleicht ist es eine Reflexion der Einstellung des Betrachters, wenn er eine ihm unbekannte menschliche Form sieht? Vielleicht ist es beides oder es bleibt offen und erweitert damit seine Kapazitäten für Nachhall und Relationalität.

 

Was in der amerikanischen Popkultur als „American Beauty“ (blonde Haare, blaue Augen) auftaucht, ist eine weitere Trope, die man Steins Arbeit zur Seite stellen könnte. Jedoch wird dieser Standard durch die eindeutig clownhaften Übertreibungen von Merkmalen in Steins Arbeiten konterkariert.[14] Hinzu kommt, dass die so genannte „American Beauty“ seit Neuestem aus der Mode gekommen zu sein scheint und Umfragen von Schönheitsforschern seit 2011 Frauen gemischter ethnischer Herkunft als Inbegriff der Schönheit identifizieren.[15] Dieses antiquierte Schönheitsideal erinnert uns an Steins Bürde gegenüber ihren Vorgänger im Bereich der Provokationen von Schönheitsstandards, etwa Jeff Koons, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein und andere zeitgenössische und klassische Pop-Künstler gleichermaßen. Ganz eindeutig bedient sich Stein ihrer Kollegen als Inspiration und wird dadurch zu einer Erweiterung derselben.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Da blondes Haar eher zu einem Trend als zu einem spezifischen Merkmal wird, sind Reaktionen auf die Demokratisierung physischer Eigenschaften im Überfluss vorhanden. Während Black Lives Matter durch die Vereinigten Staaten hallt und die Flüchtlingsaufnahme die EU erschüttert, taucht in New York und Calabasas ein Paar trotziger Pferdeschwänze auf.[16] Und ganz gleich ob im Haus der Kardashians oder in der Villa Merkel, sollten beide Räume hoffentlich daran erinnern, dass das, was existiert auch fortbestehen wird, solange wir es nicht konfrontieren, darüber reden, es verarbeiten, wieder ikonisieren und es feiern – sowohl in den Straßen von Berlin als auch in L.A. und ebenso im Museum.[17]

 

 

Befreit sich Stein durch ihre Arbeit von der herrschenden Identitätspolitik als einem Wendepunkt? Francis Bacon bemerkte 1975 zu David Sylvester: „Ich verabscheue mein eigenes Gesicht. . . . Ich habe eine Menge Selbstportraits gemalt, wirklich nur deshalb weil die Menschen um mich herum wie Fliegen gestorben sind und ich außer mir selbst niemanden mehr zu malen übrig hatte.“ [18] In Bacons eindrucksvollem Triptychon „Drei Studien für ein Selbstporträt“ taucht sein Kopf auf einem tiefen Abgrund schwarzer Farbe auf, der kein Gefühl für den umgebenden Raum zulässt. Dieser so eng begrenzte Blick erlaubt nur ein Nachsinnen über das Gesicht selbst: seine Verwüstungen, seine tiefen psychologischen Abgründe und das Gefühl, sich langsam von einem Bild zum nächsten zu drehen, wie in einem trägen Kameraschwenk. Dasselbe trifft auf Steins Arbeit zu, mit dem Zusatz, dass das weibliche Subjekt und die ihm eingeschriebene Subjektivität diese Werke als einzigartig sich selbst bewusst positionieren.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Während visuelle Medien und zeitgenössische Kunst in breitere elektronische Foren vordringen, wird Kunst über Kunst (über Kunst) zu einem weit gedehnten Echo. In diesem Fanfarenlärm rund um „Kunst“ (oder DJing, Partyfotografie oder jeder andere Trend vor der Jahrtausendwende) wuchert eine soziale Wertschätzung von Kunst als Idee, Anstrengung oder kulturellem Signifikanten, während es nuanciertere Stimmen kritischer, zeitgenössischer Kunst austrocknet, die das Bewusstsein vertiefen zu suchen, anstelle es breiter zu machen.

 

Die Zeit, die Jahrtausendwende kritisch zu begutachten, schwillt inmitten der brechenden Wellen einer originellen und globalen Kulturanpassung des Realen. Damit die Deutungen des menschlichen Bewusstseins und der feministischen Ideologie in die Sphäre der „Hochkultur“ eindringen können, muss sich die Gesellschaft als Institution den informationsbasierten Formen von Schöpfung und Konsum ohne Hierarchien von Arbeit und Reichtum anpassen. Das ist es auch, was Stein mit ihrer Selbstportraitierung zu katalysieren sucht. Mit Filtern, die sowohl Subjekte als auch Objekte gleichmachen, unterwandert Stein ein Medium, das in der Gegenwartskunst noch nicht vorhanden ist, und fordert ihren Betrachter auf, die Distanz zwischen Selfie-Stick und dem Selbst zu durchqueren, und ihre Gemälde mit der gleichen Unmittelbarkeit wie ein Instagram Foto zu untersuchen.

 

 

 

Literatur

 

Brown, David Alan. “Leonardo and the Idealized Portrait in Milan.” Arte Lombarda, No. 67, 1983. S.102-116.

 

Harper, Bernard und Latto, Richard. “The Non-Realistic Nature of Photography: Further Reasons Why Turner Was Wrong.” Leonardo, Vol. 40 No. 3, 2007. S. 243-247.

 

Dawson, Alene. “What is beauty and who has it?” CNN, June 29, 2011. Online. http://edition.cnn.com/2011/LIVING/06/29/global.beauty.culture/index.html,

aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Eveleth, Rose. “How fake images change our memory and behavior.” BBC Future, December 13, 2012. Online. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20121213-fake-pictures-make-real-memories,

aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Gu, Yi. “What’s in a Name? Photography and the Reinvention of Visual Truth in China, 1840-1911.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 95 No. 1, March 2013. S.120-138.

 

Guerin, Frances. Through Amateur Eyes: Film and Photography in Nazi Germany. “Amateur Film in Nazi Germany.” University of Minnesota Press. November 30, 2011. USA. S.29-32

 

Janis, Carroll. “IS IT, OR ISN’T IT?” Notes in the History of Art, Vol. 24 No. 2, Winter 2005. Online. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/sou.24.2.23208117,

aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Lin, Summer. “Kim Kardashian Just Dyed Her Hair Platinum Blonde Again.” Elle, September 6. 2017. Online. http://www.elle.com/beauty/a12185549/kim-kardashian-platinum-blonde-again/, acessed Feb 17 2018.

 

Plagens, Peter. “Some Problems in Recent Painting.” Art Journal, Vol. 30 No. 2, Winter 1970-1971. Online. https://www.jstor.org/stable/775430, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Shelton, Andrew Carrington. “Art, Politics, and the Politics of Art: Ingres’s “Saint Symphorien” at the 1834 Salon.” The Art Bulletin, Vol. 83 No. 4. S.711-739.

 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art. “Francis Bacon: Three Studies for a Self Portrait.” Online. https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/489966, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Thompson, Clive. “How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked – And Played.” Smithsonian Magazine, March 2015. Online. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/duplication-nation-3D-printing-rise-180954332/, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Twenge, Jean M. “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” The Atlantic, September 2017. Online. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphone-destroyed-a-generation/534198/, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

 

Vitelli, Romeo. “Media Exposure and the ‘Perfect Body.’” Psychology Today, November 2013. Online. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/media-spotlight/201311/media-exposure-and-the-perfect-body, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018
de Vries, Dian A. “Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model.” Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 45 No. 1, January 2016. Online. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698286/, aufgerufen am 17.02.2018

Fußnoten:

[1] Siehe: Thompson für eine Analyse des sozialen Einfluss des Fotokopierers

[2] Siehe: William Egglestons Fotografien – die emblematisch als Pionierarbeiten für die Anerkennung von farbfotografie als Kunst sind. Diese Arbeiten ebneten den Weg für die darauffolgenden zwanzig Jahre ähnlichen ästhetischen Ausdrucks in der Farbfotografie. Heute können viele Arbeiten auf einen Blick datiert werden, aufgrund dessen, wie eng sie sich an Egglestons Ästhetik orientieren

[3] Zum Zeitpunkt dieses Schreibens (2017, Änderungen sind vorbehalten und werden höchstwahrscheinlich sehr schnell folgen)

[4] Siehe: Twenge für eine Definition von “the twin rise of the smartphone and social media.”

[5] Siehe: Vitelli.

[6]Mit “spezifischen Eigenschaften des Mediums Malerei” beziehe ich mich auf die Einschränkungen und Stärken von Malerei als einer Form der Repräsentation – beispielsweise verglichen mit Fotografie, die offenkundig eher in der Lage ist ein Abbild der Realität zu dokumentieren. Siehe: Janis und Plagens – für eine kurze Einführung in diesen Bereich der Kunsttheorie.

.

[7] Siehe: de Vries Vries.

[8] Siehe: Eveleth.

[9] Hierbei handelt es sich um enen komplexen psychologischen Problemfall, der seit hunderten Jahren ausgenutzt wird um das Verhalten von konsumenten zu beeinflussen. Vgl. Harper, Gu, and Guerin. Guerin’s Studie wird in den folgenden Abschnitten ausführlicher diskutiert.

[10] Siehe: Guerin.

[11] Ebd.

[12] Vgl. Brown – Velasquez nahm bekanntermaßen ebenfalls nicht an dieser Praxis teil.

[13] Gemeint ist, unsere Unfähigkeit Frauen zu objektifizieren, wenn wir uns mit widersprüchlichen Exemplaren dieser Spezies konfrontiert sehen.

[14] Siehe: Dawson.

[15] Ebd.

[16]Siehe: Lin für Details zu dieser Referenz, die sich auf Kim Kardashian bezieht – eine Figur des öffentlichen Lebens und Fashion-Ikone, die für ihren Körperbau, Geschäftssinn, so wie ihr glattes schwarzes Haar bekannt ist – und zudem dafür ihr Haar blond gefärbt zu haben.

[17] Diese Diskussion bezüglich Stein als blondes Subjekt entstammte einer Konversation mit Patrick Meagher, einem Kollegen Steins.

[18] Siehe: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.